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A POWERFUL hurricane that could unleash strong gales and torrential rain will bring weather chaos to Britain before the end of Autumn, according to forecasters.

Tropical storm season has reached its peak with violent depressions dramatically increasing in strength and frequency across the Atlantic Ocean.

Weather experts expect this year to be brutal, with some forecasting up to 19 tropical storms – including 10 hurricanes – to blight countries in the Northern Hemisphere.

Eight tropical storms and three hurricanes have already savaged the US, with 130mph Hurricane Harvey killing at least 30 with biblical flooding.

Britain hasn’t been unscathed either after the remains of Hurricane Gertrude brought almost a week of weather mayhem to the country last month.

With summer almost over, forecasters are predicting that the remnants of another super storm could wreak havoc with Britain’s weather system in the coming months.


Tropical storm season has reached its peak with violent depressions dramatically increasing in strength and frequency across the Atlantic Ocean.

Weather experts expect this year to be brutal, with some forecasting up to 19 tropical storms – including 10 hurricanes – to blight countries in the Northern Hemisphere.

Eight tropical storms and three hurricanes have already savaged the US, with 130mph Hurricane Harvey killing at least 30 with biblical flooding.

Britain hasn’t been unscathed either after the remains of Hurricane Gertrude brought almost a week of weather mayhem to the country last month.

With summer almost over, forecasters are predicting that the remnants of another super storm could wreak havoc with Britain’s weather system in the coming months.

In June The Met Office predicted that 13 tropical storms would develop in the Atlantic Ocean between June 1 and November 30, with a 70% chance that could rise to 16.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) forecasters in the US are predicting an above-normal season, with up to 19 named storms, including up to five more major hurricanes.

Its latest forecast reads: “There is a 60% chance of an above-normal season, with 14 to 19 named storms and two to five major hurricanes.”

David Dilley, forecaster and CEO of Global Weather Oscillations, said that at least 16 tropical storms are likely to occur this season, according to his models.

Speaking to Daily Star Online, he said that the leftovers of a fading hurricane are likely to bring weather misery to the UK before the end of the season.

He said: “I am predicting 16 named storms and most prediction organisations have raised their prediction to match mine.

“I do expect that an extra tropical – mixed decaying remnants of a hurricane – may very well make it across the Atlantic to your region.

“It’s going to be a busier season than what NOAA and Met Office originally predicted.”

Research by Tyler Roys, AccuWeather meteorologist, backs this prediction up.

Historical data shows the remains of two tropical storms have impacted western Europe every year on average since 1997, he said.

He told Daily Star Online: “The majority of those storms will impact the British Isles.

“Typically Hurricanes do not impact Europe.

“Nevertheless the remains of these tropical systems can be very impactful to the UK with heavy rainfall and gale-force and higher winds.

“Typically the best time to see these storms is in late August to November. The peak of the hurricane season is in the middle of September.”

Last month the dying embers of Hurricane Gert was enough to cause almost a week of horrific weather torrential rain, thunder and gale force winds to the UK.

Satellite images from NASA showed the colossal super storm heading towards the UK across the Atlantic Ocean.

Dan Kottlowski, hurricane forecast for AccuWeather, said it is not unusual for the UK to feel the effects of a former tropical storm or hurricane.

The UK experiences a “significant impact” for a former tropical cyclone about once every three to five years, he told Daily Star Online.

His models suggest an additional seven tropical storms and six hurricane before the season ends.

He said: “It is not uncommon for the UK to experience remnant moisture and sometimes the remnant storm winds from Atlantic hurricanes.

“For example the wet weather that impacted the UK was partially from moisture from what once was hurricane Gert.

“The injection of moisture from a former tropical storm or hurricane often leads to heavier rainfall and can lead to a higher chance for flooding rainfall.”

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